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In His Green Book - Poetry Collection - Mini Review

  In His Green Book is a poetry collection unlike any poetry collection I have ever encountered. It is a collection of prose poetry and philosophical poetry that does not always embark on word play or literary structures. Yet, it is a very enjoyable read. Terence Asitibasi creates a sacred space of wisdom and life entertained with the natural world. There is something so mesmerizing about some of the poems that speak to a deeper understanding of this world. For example, in "With New Eyes He Sees" the opening lines capture your soul: The feeling that comes deep Inside him, as he felt that He was blind Asitibasi clearly and cleverly breaks apart 'the the deep' feeling in juxtaposition to blindness. The stanza break, the unnatural pacing of the comma, everything about these opening lines keeps the reader captive. And you just want more, okay? Luckily there are over 70 poems of more! The philosophical poem "Keep Watch" kept me pondering the 'beingness'

Home Beneath the Church - Poetry Collection - A Mini Review


You know that feeling when your emotions and feelings just received a jolt and are now on the fritz? It is a feeling when your quiet thoughts and aching memories find a similar soul to speak the same language. That is how Home Beneath the Church by Lauren Davis feels for me: a meeting of feeling and energy beyond any spoken word.

But this is a mini review, and this poetry collection is very much full of words, experiences, word play, and something mystical. Maybe even divine.

The poetry collection is broken up into three sections. Other than being a division of the poems, there is almost very little difference between each section. This is not necessarily a bad thing. Just a bit of nuance from an editorial perspective.

A bit of the poems are more prose poems, there are a few rhyming gems such as "But Most of All". Theologically, there are snippets of the Christ story where Davis reinterprets Mary, the woman who anoints Jesus's feet, as a mother. There is something so beautiful about this new interpretation in "On the Deck" that is a must read. Just for fun, you can juxtapose Davis's interpretation with John 12.

My most favorite poem is "Put Me to Sleep" because it is so vulnerable and so literary. I am a total sucker for literary! The narrative of the poem begins with a jolt! "Chef slams the skillet down," Davis writes, "yells for eggs." Eggs. Not eggs! It is a little play for the readers.

Do check out Home Beneath the Church with caution, but the good kind of caution. This poetry collection will speak to your soul.

 

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